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Oyster Kids - Work It Out
Oyster Kids - Work It Out

Oyster Kids - Work It Out


In what can only be described as a watershed moment of peace-seeking in the on-going BK/LA indie scene feud, we here at The Wild Honey Pie are happy to premiere LA-based pop outfit Oyster Kids newest single, “Work It Out.” Know that while prideful of our BK-roots, we remain, first and foremost, humble servants of tasty indie jams. Thus, we are more than happy to extend the olive branch by linking up with Oyster Kids to bring you this tastefully saturated bopper. My intuition is that this song would pair nicely with a ride to the beach in a mid-80s Mercedes Convertible. It’s been about three years since the upbeat popsters released “Gum (Everybodys My Friend)." But now we’ve got “Work It Out,” their third single of 2019, to go along with “Breathe” and “Losing My Mind,” both of which trickled onto streaming services earlier this year. The kids are back.

Devon Sheridan on July 19, 2019
Modern Diet - July 4

Modern Diet - July 4


If you haven’t yet, it’s time to get familiar with NYC indie-pop band Modern Diet—after a 2-year hiatus, they are back and flooding 2019 with new tracks to play back-to-back-to-back. After their EP release in March and putting single “Dizzy” out on June 28, the band quickly followed up with their latest single, “July 4,” released, naturally, on July 4th. The song is a rambunctious follow-up to the dreamier “Dizzy” and keeps you on your toes the whole way through. The song starts out on a fairly standard drumbeat and some head-bobbing guitar strums. But we quickly realize how crucial the drums are to the movement of the track as they shift seamlessly into stick-tapping ditty before billowing into a muted marching band anthem, played appropriately under the chorus lyrics, “and Uncle Sam is getting old, getting ready to explode.” The song at once creates anxiety and propels you through it with dynamic but nearly imperceptible shifts of tempo and rhythm. The instruments build quickly and intensely then dip out as the vocals slow down, humming out “ooh’s” and “mmm’s” briefly, then pick right back up. A sense of impatience hangs over the whole track, evident in the repeated, “Told you so is ringing like a dial tone,” and as it wraps up, song screeches to its peak frustration and comes to an abrupt close as it finally hangs up the phone.

Brigid Moser on July 18, 2019
Brittany Howard - History Repeats

Brittany Howard - History Repeats


You may know Brittany Howard as the powerhouse vocalist at the helm of blues-rock group Alabama Shakes, but on her debut solo track “History Repeats,” her performance is softer (though still not soft), subtler, and much more personal. It was released along with the announcement of a debut full-length titled Jaime, named after her late sister who taught her how to play the piano, and due out Sep. 20 via ATO Records. “History Repeats” is the opening track on the album. Funky and immersive, it’s quick to differentiate its sound from any of Howard’s other projects. A drumline pound coupled with a punching, urgent kick drum and psychedelic guitar open the track, evoking a sense of persistent unease over a smooth groove. Howard’s vocals are washed out and doubled as she sings about the exhausting inevitability of repeating old mistakes, adding to the hazy, twirling effect of the arrangement. “History repeats and we defeat ourselves / Come on everybody, one more time again,” she sings in the chorus, repeating the line over and over. The song ends on an audible phew from Howard, whose enormous effort fuels the song with a contagious vigor. Clocking in at just over three minutes, “History Repeats” shows an impressive display of growth from one of indie music’s strongest female voices.

Britnee Meiser on July 17, 2019
Ritt Momney - (If) the Book Doesn't Sell

Ritt Momney - (If) the Book Doesn't Sell


Ritt Momney's track "(If) the Book Doesn't Sell" is a poetic fever dream in autotune totality. A half-ballad lament of religion long-forgotten (and evidently resented), the Mormon-raised Ritt Momney uses colorful storytelling to communicate his ongoing frustration with the worldview he was raised in. Though sung through an auto-tuned filter for the entire track, his vocals are somehow mesmerizing and very compelling. The conviction of his tone isn't lost because of this but is actually amplified by the auto-tune affectation. The message of Ritt Momney's "(If) the Book Doesn't Sell" seems evident and can be summed up simply by the lyric "The Devil speaks / Your God and I put all our differences to rest and the man's actions are his own, but man will blame us nonetheless." The artist is pleading to be taken seriously as he endeavors to determine his own beliefs regarding the divine and pleads with other kids being raised in religion to ponder their independence and humanity in a similar way. It's a song of genuine yearning and struggle that many coming-of-age types can relate to.

Hannah Lupas on July 16, 2019
Darcie - Modern Day Housewife

Darcie - Modern Day Housewife


Up-and-coming singer and multi-instrumentalist Zigi Porter, who operates under the moniker Darcie, strikes an inimitable balance between subtlety and spaciousness with her minimalist songwriting and maximalist production style. The eclectic, Manchester-based solo artist’s recently released track “Modern Day Housewife” captures the essence of what makes her both a no-nonsense storyteller and a mystical tour de force. The song is an artful, left-of-center rumination on the life and unbending expectations of millennials. With down-to-earth yet unapologetically honest phrasing like, “We are we are / Cosmetically / Replacing our brains” Porter points to the ways in which our obsession with constantly improving our outward appearance is rapidly contributing to our inevitable demise. Although this phenomenon affects each and every one of us, female and feminine-identifying people often feel a certain pressure to build up these fabricated, social-media-constructed personas. That being said, Porter doesn't use any gender-specific language other than the term 'housewife' which she adapts in an all-inclusive way. Porter’s lyrics might appear overly critical on the surface, but it’s important to keep in mind that as a young millennial woman she is highlighting problems that she herself faces. “Modern Day Housewife” is a communal effort to help us all understand ourselves in this current day and age a little better. Darcie’s ethereal, lo-fi pop-soul sound is truly genre-bending and impossible to classify—there is nothing else like it. Look out for Darcie’s debut EP Conversations with a Hot Dog due for release at the end of July.

Andrea de Varona on July 15, 2019
Devendra Banhart - Kantori Ongaku

Devendra Banhart - Kantori Ongaku


“Kantori Ongaku”, the leading single from Devendra Banhart’s forthcoming LP Ma, imagines an alternate universe where Haruomi Hosono and Lou Reed collaborated on a track. Reed is long gone and the 71-year-old Hosono is busy touring and recording, providing Banhart with a special space to pay tribute to the Japanese pop legend. Though acts like Mac DeMarco and Vampire Weekend have respectively paid their dues to the prolific Japanese musician, Banhart forgoes covering or sampling Hosono and instead chooses to compose an original song with Japanese idioms. Banhart’s Reed-esque cadence hovers lightly above the relaxed melody. The sonic quality of the song is seemingly captured by the song’s name “Kantori Ongaku”, which means “country music”, conjuring a warm and breezy locale—qualities that can also be used to describe the production style. Banhart’s lyricism weaves Japanese concepts for the purpose of telling an introspective story about the one that got away. In the chorus, Banhart sings “Shikata ga nai”, which roughly translates to “nothing can be done”, or maybe a shrug. Throughout the song, Banhart returns back to that phrase while ruminating retrospectively, “It's getting too late to tell if it's too soon” and “I showed up at your wedding.” Banhart’s passive acceptance is best captured in the track's coda when he croons, “Still there's no more beautiful pace / Than the moonlight on your face”—hinting at how letting go can often be complex and lost in translation.

Thomas Paparella on July 15, 2019
L. Martin - Summer

L. Martin - Summer


L. Martin's newest single "Summer" leads with zippy punches of synth and his effortlessly entrancing voice, as he sings of the prospect of grasping onto something that will not be transient. Formerly the vocal front runner of indie-rock five-piece, The WaltersL. Martin, (a.k.a. Luke Martin Olsen), continues to create art with vigor on his own time. When inquired about the meaning of "Summer," he responded: “It’s essentially about my experiences in the music industry that have made me rethink its importance in my life”. Balancing optimism instrumentally and slight discontent lyrically, the track tugs us in with its initial 80’s feel-good sound and holds onto us with its meaningful draw. L. Martin will be releasing his EP, KICKS, which is promised to be equally as energetic as this single on August 9th.

Laney Esper on July 15, 2019
Kevin Krauter - Pretty Boy

Kevin Krauter - Pretty Boy


“Pretty Boy” is the dreamy new single from Indiana indie-pop artist, Kevin KrauterHis first release since his 2018 album, Toss Up, “Pretty Boy” continues to deliver his understated lyrics with soft, sensitive vocals to match. This time, he adds an extra dose of nostalgia in his music. From the beginning, his smooth opening guitar riffs have a lulling effect that effortlessly wrap you in. By the time the steady drum beats kick in and he begins to sing, he’s created an atmosphere perfect for slow dancing in a middle school gym. His lyrics, however, suggest a stormier side as he battles with inner demons. As he sings, “Steppin’ in, steppin’ right on through / Same old shit, same old solitude,” he wrestles with the continuous feeling of loneliness. Like its title suggests, “Pretty Boy” has a subtle beauty with its unique blend of introspection and wistfulness. This reflective tune will transport you to a perfectly moody daydream, and Krauter reminds us that it’s not always such a bad place to be.

Rachel Hynds on July 12, 2019
Samia - Ode to Artifice

Samia - Ode to Artifice


Sharp-toothed and honey slick: somehow Samia, the 22-year-old New York songstress whose warbling wit has captured the attention of acts like Father John Misty, manages both. The singer’s latest release, “Ode to Artifice,” stands as no exception, serving up a relatable dose of anxious self-reflection wherein she begs her authentic self and stage persona to just merge already! “Keep it together for both of us,” she pleads, her desperate itch for a confidence supplemented by more than just makeup and party tricks sanded down into an inviting, retro-groove. Such vulnerable self-cynicism—a phrasing that would sound utterly oxymoronic to the uninitiated ear—is nothing new to the artist, who often uses her work to explore the ugly and uncomfortable through a feminist lens. It’s enough to argue that Samia goes down kind of like a top-shelf whiskey; in her warmth and smoothness, there's a potency that will absolutely kick your ass if you’re not careful.

Lindsay Thomaston on July 12, 2019
​Generationals - Breaking Your Silence

​Generationals - Breaking Your Silence


Generationals are a beautiful anachronism. They write the kind of songs you might (quite reasonably) assume were hits decades ago the first time you hear them because their soulful, retro stylings are more than an excuse to write soulful, retro songs, but are instead an inseparable facet of the band’s identity. But they seem to love smoothing over these potentially jarring juxtaposition—in the accompanying video for their latest single, “Breaking Your Silence,” a truck mounted with a video billboard shows the band performing in front of a vanilla concrete wall while driving through the idyllic wilderness. The truck, with its abrasive video screen, seems out of place at first, but dogs still frolic in its wake. The drum kit sounds like it’s covered in a layer of dust and the chorus explodes with a wall of sound like the Motown greats, but these techniques are used in the service of a sound more akin to trendsetters like The Strokes than to other retro-soul reenactors. Generationals’ fourth full-length album, Reader As Detective, is due out July 19th.

Daniel Shanker on July 12, 2019
Casey Dubie - Confetti*

Casey Dubie - Confetti*


Vermont-born singer-songwriter Casey Dubie has arrived with a stripped down version of her folk-pop ballad, “Confetti.” Feather-soft musings of both ache and fondness cascade around the listener like the very squares of rainbow tissue the song is named for. Such lightness is thanks in part to Dubie’s chiming harmonies echoing in the background, which lend a fuller, more mesmerizing tone to the song’s acoustic approach. Fans of acts like Daughter and Oh Wonder will appreciate “Confetti*"'s warm glow and accessible lyricism.

Lindsay Thomaston on July 11, 2019

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