Buzzing Daily

Find Buzzing Daily on Spotify

​Joseph - Come On Up to the House
​Joseph - Come On Up to the House

​Joseph - Come On Up to the House


Joseph recently treated us to “Come On Up to the House,” the titular and opening track of Come On Up to the House: Women Sing Waits, an all-female tribute to Tom Waits, featuring the likes of Phoebe Bridgers, The Wild Reeds and Rosanne Cash. The original is a joyous and welcoming anthem, urging listeners to take the lemons life has given them and squeeze out every last drop — “All your crying don’t do no good / Come on up to the house / Come down off the cross, we can use the wood.” Though the gravel in his voice could only ever come from Waits himself, he sings with the weight of a choir of barflies swaying shoulder-to-shoulder with their pints in hand. It would have been easy for Joseph to follow that same stomp-and-holler formula that makes their early singles so infectious. Nobody would have asked for anything more. Instead, theirs is a somber take on the song, stunning and singular. Where Waits sounds triumphant and inviting, Joseph sounds tired and alone, almost as if they are singing the song to themselves because nobody else will. Backed by only a piano and a string section, the three sisters take turns with their lonesome verses, reserving their combined harmonies for the grand finale, acknowledging the difficulty but necessity, of finding unity where it seems impossible.

Daniel Shanker on November 7, 2019
Hazel English - Shaking

Hazel English - Shaking


Hazel English has been relatively quiet since the release of her stellar 2017 album Just Give In / Never Going Home. Awash in surf-rock instrumentation and sunshiny melodies, the album was a fun, carefree drive down the LA coastline. Now the Aussie-born Californian is stepping up her game—she’s back with a new single, and it’s bolder than ever. “Shaking,” out today from Polyvinyl Record Co., shows her depth as an artist and ear for arrangement. Sharper percussion and full, more mature instrumentation take the track from the beach to the basement of the coolest club, where the crowd is full and everybody is dancing without judgment. The track has a continuous undercurrent of confidence, both in the energy and vigor of the instruments and in English’s soft, swoon-worthy voice. “Get down on your hands and knees / Baby beg for me,” she sings in a controlled, wispy soprano, embracing the subtle power of her femininity. Overall, “Shaking” is a battle cry for self-discovery and self-love, empowering listeners to live their lives to the fullest and embrace change.

Britnee Meiser on November 6, 2019
Sorry - Right Round The Clock

Sorry - Right Round The Clock


London-based outfit Sorry take a look at some of the things that send us into a head spin in their stunning new track, “Right Round The Clock." It’s the first offering from their freshly announced debut album 925, which arrives next year. The project, steered by Asha Lorenz and Louis O'Bryen and accompanied by drummer Lincoln Barrett and bassist Campbell Baum, launches deep into how grand aspirations and the need to feel wanted can trap us in a whirling cycle of aimless direction. Lorenz and O’Bryen’s straightforward, matter-of-fact delivery acts as a nice companion to the swaying, eccentric production that bounces in the background. As the duo announces in unison “I’m feeling kinda crazy / I’m feeling kinda mad / The dreams in which we’re famous are the best I’ve ever had," you can feel their yearning to manifest something real and significant. This idea is further amplified in the music video for the single, directed by Lorenz and regular collaborator Jasper Cable-Alexander. While we try and maneuver through our individual realities, one thing is certain: Sorry is a creative force to keep an eye on. 925 is set to release in the spring of 2020 via Domino.

Meredith Vance on November 6, 2019
​Matt Berninger & Phoebe Bridgers - Walking on a String

​Matt Berninger & Phoebe Bridgers - Walking on a String


Matt Berninger of The National and Phoebe Bridgers team up to inject sincerity into the Netflix comedy Between Two Ferns: The Movie, directed by Scott Aukerman and starring Zach Galifianakis. "It always brings me back here / Into the garden by the hand / You've always had me walking on a string," they sing, mimicking the dynamic between host Galifianakis's production crew, portrayed by Lauren Lapkus, Ryan Gaul, and Jiavani Linayao, and their borderline abusive boss. While the lyrics convey the ways a tight-knit team can help each other through their messes, Berninger stated, "It’s also just a love song between a spider and a moth.” Given free reign by Aukerman to write a song for the film, Berninger and his long-time collaborator and wife Carin Besser penned lyrics that allow Bridgers' haunting vocals to shine; Walter Martin and Matt Barrick of The Walkmenround out your new favorite country band, Phoebe and the Spiders of Bars. "Walking on a String" appears at the 42-minute-mark as Galiafanakis makes a toast to his team, one of the rare vulnerable, intimate moments on an otherwise irreverent cross-country journey to produce the next great American talk show.

Ysabella Monton on November 6, 2019
Elah Hale - Holding You Close

Elah Hale - Holding You Close


Singer-songwriter Elah Hale tells a story of love lost on her latest single "Holding You Close." Compared to other singles by the New York artist, this one takes on a more somber tone–delving deeper into the intimacies of a relationship with swelling vocals and melancholy piano. The song opens and eases itself comfortably into a swaying ballad that honors the end of the relationship with bittersweet words that sound warm coming from Hale's unique voice. Soft instrumentals cushion the blow of the inevitable parting from her lover, but in the end, she knows that even reminiscing about the good times won't help. "Holding You Close" is revealing, solemn, and soul-bearing–an exciting new piece for Hale's ever-expanding collection of songs.

Julie Gentile on November 5, 2019
Alex Siegel - Wasted Time

Alex Siegel - Wasted Time


Alex Siegel maintains a gentle lo-fi groove in "Wasted Time." The LA-based bedroom pop artist sings softly over meticulously crafted layers of synths. For a song about not wanting to waste time, it creeps along with immense patience—swelling only briefly near the end as he repeats "I don’t want to waste any more time." The steady bassline and hi-hat throughout keep the track grounded as everything else floats in and around. Siegel’s jazz influence creeps its way in adding complexity to the simple melody and lyrics. It’s the perfect song for a rainy day in bed or the quiet hours of the night when it feels like you’re the only person in the world—easy to listen to, but not so simple that it becomes background noise. "Wasted Love" is the most recent single off Siegel’s newest EP Up All Night, which came out on October 4.

Corinne Bates on November 5, 2019
Marian Hill - like u do

Marian Hill - like u do


Philly-bred duo Marian Hill rises from the ashes with their jazzy new single "like u do." The track evokes the moment where you watch an ex from afar perform their usual canned charm and wit on someone else. Jeremy Lloyd's understated, yet dynamic beat mimics that allure while the levity and clarity of Gongol's voice are as refreshing as realizing you now see right through them. The higher tempo and magnetic flair tap into a brighter energy from the duo, contrasting past releases. "'like u do' was written directly in reaction to our getting tired of writing darker slower songs for several weeks," said Lloyd. "It felt like a massive breath of fresh air when we finally found it."

Ysabella Monton on November 5, 2019
Margaux - Cave In

Margaux - Cave In


Autumn—the romantic season of fiery, golden leaves, nipping winds and hot, steaming mugs of coffee—never lasts long enough. “December came too fast,” sings Margaux Bouchegnies over the delicately lo-fi intro to her new single, “Cave In.” The Seattle bred, Brooklyn-based 20-year-old singer-songwriter counts Joni Mitchell among her main influences. Even in its nascent stage, Margaux’s songwriting internalizes Mitchell’s touch for bluesy naturalism. About a minute in, “Cave In” dynamically shifts to crunchier instrumentation. From there, subtle scene changes abound; like stomping on an overdrive pedal, “Cave In” quickly jumps between jarring fuzziness and melodic resolution. Snail Mail and Car Seat Headrest come to mind: both artists write incredibly mature and lush arrangements that, primarily, originate from the guitar. Like them, Margaux’s patient storytelling intertwines with softly-confident vocal execution. Yet, it’s her penchant for airy, symphonic production (see: “Palm,” her other recent single) that sets Margaux apart. Combined with—and perhaps even thanks to—her deft guitar playing, her ambitious songwriting already feels fully actualized.

Devon Sheridan on November 1, 2019
The Bright Light Social Hour - Sun King

The Bright Light Social Hour - Sun King


Following their 2016 cover of The Beach Boys’ “All I Wanna Do,” it’s clear that The Bright Light Social Hour is unafraid to tackle the untouchable icons of the ‘60s with their modern take on that era’s own psychedelia. The Beatles, to say nothing of Brian Wilson’s genius, are a cultural touchstone comparable to little else in the last century, and their songs often stand-in for the very definition of pop songs themselves. While we see new geniuses tear down those very definitions, The Beatles’ catalogue remains almost sacred to many. In “Sun King,” The Bright Light Social Hour celebrates Abbey Road’s 50th anniversary with a cover of a side-two classic, using it as a vessel for their signature groove. It could have been any Beatles song, or even any other song if not for the instantly recognizable nature of The Fab Four track. They choose not to honor the original note-for-note, nor do they claim that their song is the way it should have been. The track is right there in the source material, and their chops are evident in the performance.

Daniel Shanker on November 1, 2019
Kate Bollinger - No Other Like You

Kate Bollinger - No Other Like You


“No Other Like You,” the newest single from Virginia-based artist Kate Bollinger, has a sweet melody and a sultry beat. The hazy, lo-fi jam is the definition of late-night vibes, with spacey synths, a chill, uplifting guitar and one of the grooviest basslines of the year swinging to a slow, almost psychedelic rhythm. The instrumentation is soft, warm and nostalgic; it’s the perfect backdrop for a low-key night in or a road trip under the stars. But Bollinger’s voice, evoking the same laid-back, transfixing charm as Nora Jones, is the star of the arrangement. Breezy and dynamic, her voice makes you feel like you’re floating through a lovely dream. The lyrics are about accepting impermanence, and Bollinger’s wistful croon emphasizes that. “Baby can't you see there's no other like you / When you leave I'll expect the things you'd always do.” Cozy and cool, “No Other Like You” is about to become your new favorite sad love song.

Britnee Meiser on October 31, 2019
Frank Ocean - DHL

Frank Ocean - DHL


Hypnotizing listeners back into his universe yet again, Frank Ocean returns with highly hyped new single “DHL” from the artist’s first studio album release since 2016. The track dropped unannounced at the end of Ocean’s most recent blonded RADIO session, giving a taste of what is rumored to be a thirteen-track LP. Ocean teams up with electro-house producer Boys Noize on “DHL” and delivers swirling sounds and carefully casual lyrics. The song begins with his signature, stylized ambient noise—reminiscent of a more somber, slow version to the introduction of “Nikes.” He raps about a lover, things he’s bought, and attending fashion week in camping gear, “Look like I’m dressed for a hike / But I really look like I’m in Paris.” A mundane tone, almost droning, takes over the beats of the song and paints a portrait of Ocean in his day to day life—as normal as it can be. Following the announcement of “DHL” came the news of two other singles, “Cayendo” and “Dear April." Both were premiered at Ocean's new club PrEP+, where the artist played some remixed snippets. Both old and new Frank fans alike can look forward to new content being released in this era of activity.

Julie Gentile on October 31, 2019

Subscribe