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Wingtip - Pavement
Wingtip - Pavement

Wingtip - Pavement


San Fran native, Nick Perloff-Giles's — otherwise known as Wingtip — coastal upbringing has deeply influenced his music. His moderately electro vibes mixed in with an acoustic-pop feel display remnants of his former beach life.  "Pavement," the first single to come off of Wingtip's upcoming EP, Ghosts of Youthcaptures these sounds. Starting with light synths and a gentle acoustic guitar line, "Pavement" builds as the story it tells unfolds. Tasteful electronic elements also paint it with a sense of character and youth. The nostalgic themes of lost love, getting older and being a little reckless capture the quintessence of growing up. Ultimately, "Pavement" is a song about the good ol' days and the hope that they're not all behind you. Just one listen and chances are you'll be taken back to that one summer that made you want to live forever. 

Dara Bankole on July 27, 2018
Hayley Gene Penner - Smaller

Hayley Gene Penner - Smaller


Full of honesty and grace, Hayley Gene Penner's brave new single, "Smaller," speaks to the deep desire to be loved and the fear that it may be easier if you were someone else. Honing in on the struggle of body-image, Penner sings, "If I'm smaller and I'm different / Just a little less / Would you love me?" These words cut to the core and find you in a place you know all too well. "Smaller" shines with a quiet boldness. Penner refuses to hide behind metaphors or similes as she sings her truths with such sincerity and vulnerability. Like most toxic thoughts, it's easy to hear the danger in them when you yourself are not thinking them — it's a lot harder to recognize their toxicity when they're in your own head. Smaller" lets you connect with Penner as she sings of her battle with self-image while also allowing you to notice the lack of self-love you may have been showing yourself for longer than you realized.

Dara Bankole on July 26, 2018
Joyce Manor - Million Dollars to Kill Me

Joyce Manor - Million Dollars to Kill Me


Joyce Manor know how to pack a punch into a bit-sized box. New single “Million Dollars to Kill Me” recalls the late-90s midwestern emo scene with its guitar crunch and tongue-in-cheek title. “And one day you will realize / You are nothing, nothing without her / You’re an asshole from the bar,” frontman Barry Johnson spits out. The track’s full-blooded, all-American guitar riff is fist-pumping-ly anthemic, while the drums borrow from pop-punk’s propensity for cymbal crashes. Rarely has a track felt so simultaneously venomous and fun.

Michael O'Neill on July 26, 2018
the king heat ensemble - Give or take

the king heat ensemble - Give or take


More often than not, when a band has a killer, memorable name their music does not live up to it, but once in a while, there are exceptions. The fresh, folk-inspired UK group, the king heat ensemble is one of those special cases. The track, “Give or take,” off their most recent EP epitomizes what it means to make a blanket-genre like acoustic-folk sound original and refreshing all while maintaining its organic nature. “Give or take” begins with bouncy, steel-string guitar picking as the lead singer briskly introduces himself 7-seconds in with a stirring yet understated vocal delivery. His voice is a tamed hybrid of James Taylor and Conor Oberst, which adds an alternative stroke to an otherwise heavily bluegrass inspired landscape. He sings, “Everybody here knows when you’ve got to stop to start again,” with a red-yellow tone, a warmness, and positivity that is speckled with patches of tanginess. The king heat ensemble is giving you an encouraging pat on the back, while sternly whispering, “start again.”  

Andrea de Varona on July 25, 2018
Gold Star - Baby Face

Gold Star - Baby Face


Los Angeles’ Gold Star combines disparate influences, from Americana to Britpop to Classic Rock into a surprisingly familiar sound on new single "Baby Face." The verse oozes Old West cool, something that might have come from the guitar of Turn Blue era Dan Auerbach or AM era Alex Turner, before launching into a fully Beatles-inspired chorus, complete with swirling Wurlitzer chords and reverb-laden double-tracked vocals. “Baby Face” is a song you may as well have heard the day you were born, greeting you with a loving epithet, but given a modern spin by an obviously devoted student of music. Contradictions are at the core of this song, at once retro and refreshing, then cocky but unsure. “I’m still not certain what it takes,” croons singer Marlon Rabenreither, “Are you in / Are you out?” Even the instrumentation takes two sides, as the smooth guitar’s conversation with the thumping bass forms the backbone of the song’s hook, introducing us to the song and leading us out with no answers. 

Daniel Shanker on July 24, 2018
Michl - Tell Her

Michl - Tell Her


Rising Los Angeles artist Michl has revealed a stunning rework of Lauryn Hill’s “Tell Him” with his new summer love song “Tell Her.” This synth-heavy version is an emotional ballad featuring a gorgeous balance of organs, stripped back guitar and smooth vocals that pay homage to the original but still manages to be unique. The authenticity in Michl’s voice matches the emotional honesty of the lyrics, “I’ll never be jealous and I won’t be too proud / ‘cause love is not boastful / No and love is not loud / just tell her I need her.” This song is full of themes of hope and promise and reminds listeners that despite the ups and downs of relationships, “everything is gonna be alright.”

Alessandra Rincon on July 23, 2018
Margot - Tired

Margot - Tired


London dream-pop outfit Margot creates the kind of masterful, floating soundscapes one would expect from seasoned veterans of the genre. Perfect for a rainy London afternoon, “Tired” is the hazy daydream of someone unable to keep up with the pace of change in his life. “Get off your phone and tell me how you feel,” he pleads, wading through the sea of swirling guitars in an attempt to make any sort of meaningful, lasting connection, but not even the support of a string section can save him now. He has been rejected, he has been shut out and he is terrified to admit that time races only forwards. Things are looking up though. As the song fades out, the future uncertain, he has traded his relentless pessimism — “You’ve grown...I just don’t know you anymore” — for something a little more understanding and hopeful — “You’ve grown / and so should I /  We’ll work it out eventually.”

Daniel Shanker on July 23, 2018
Ferdinand the Bull - Wooden Fire Escape

Ferdinand the Bull - Wooden Fire Escape


Meeting in college, this young group of talented Pittsburgh musicians has been playing together and touring the country for three years now as folk band Ferdinand the BullTheir newest release “Wooden Fire Escape” off their upcoming sophomore album, “Painting Over Pictures” out August 11, is a catchy tune reminding you to be optimistic even in dismal situations. Characteristic of frontman Nick Snyder’s lyrical style, “Wooden Fire Escape” is full of themes about nature and love. Pulsating under Snyder’s vocals is a great backtrack of kick drum and guitar strums that make you want to get up and dance along.    

Kathryn Brooks on July 18, 2018
Why Bonnie - Stereo

Why Bonnie - Stereo


Hailing from Austin, Texas bedroom-pop band Why Bonnie is back with their new EP "Nightgown." The third track, "Stereo," captures the essence and charm of the five-piece band. Front-woman, Blair Howerton's voice carries on subdued and consistent while it lies on a bed of warm synths and an electric guitar making the song itself a blanket of comfort. Nevertheless, a pleasant yet unexpected shift comes as if to throw off the blanket and expose the unkempt sheets underneath. Howerton jumps the octave introducing a new type of emotion to the mix. As it builds, passive becomes active, apathy becomes caring, all heard and felt within high notes and louder dynamics. The song ends similarly to how it began, emulating just how natural it is to fall back into our composure after a moment of frenzied vulnerability and clarity.

Dara Bankole on July 17, 2018
Yvonne Hercules - Roving

Yvonne Hercules - Roving


Sometimes we all need a moment to pause and breathe. A minute to recalibrate and separate from our fast-moving, tech-heavy bubbles. Yvonne Hercules' latest track, "Roving" will immerse you in that safe, meditative space. The London-based singer-songwriter's buttery, wholesome voice stirs you on a spiritual level. Beyond its undeniable emotional capacity, the song also carries a deep political message in the most tranquil way. It's often so difficult to marry calmness and passion, but Hercules voices her stance on police brutality and the mistreatment of minority groups in a fervent, purely collected manner. Silky, wave-like guitar riffs float lightly above sweeping, saccharine harmonies as she sings out, "And we fall down / The shots ring out / The shots ring out." Hercules' experimental folk is sure to leave a permanent mark on the hearts and ears of music fans around the globe. 

Andrea de Varona on July 17, 2018
Sophie Meiers — Something About You

Sophie Meiers — Something About You


You know the kind of old-timey, vibey music that normally plays behind the "falling in love" montage in indie romantic dramas like 500 Days of Summer or Blue Valentine? The kind of song that was rediscovered on a cassette tape at the artist manager's estate sale decades after it was recorded? Now picture that song enveloped in warm, saturated, lo-fi production and the vocals of Erykah Badu and Nai Palm's lovechild, and you have singer-songwriter/producer, Sophie Meiers' latest track, "Something About You." 

The 18-year-old, who also goes by the producer alias, "GUTTERGIRL", is unafraid to speak openly about her feelings. An air of delicate, heartfelt nostalgia consistently permeates her genre-bending work. "Something About You" captures the ways in which she manages to remain unapologetically herself through her inventive use of background harmonies paired with layers of watery, atmospheric tones and bouncy, Nintendo-inspired synths. Sophie Meiers is a young, surefire artist who has and will continue to push the limits of what it means to be a lo-fi, bedroom musician. Be sure to look out for her debut solo EP coming out later this year! 

Andrea de Varona on July 16, 2018

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