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Loyal Lobos - Burn
Loyal Lobos - Burn

Loyal Lobos - Burn


Loyal Lobos' debut EP releases today with soft-rock song "Burn" as its stand-out. It’s a song you can’t help to sway to and her youthful vocals drive the somber lyrics home. The LA native’s voice carries a relatable longing felt by her words and heard in her voice. The lines "You hold me just like my mother does, it hurts like hell / You broke, so watch me burn again" evoke a particular and familiar sadness. The simple percussion and guitar push her echo-y vocals to the forefront of the track with a slightly haunting aura as they intensify into the chorus — a feeling almost like finding something you thought you’d lost. Loyal Lobos' “Burn” is a sad song well-done. 

Jazzmyne Pearson on November 14, 2018
Zimmer ft. Panama - Wildflowers

Zimmer ft. Panama - Wildflowers


We all have an imaginary place of escape. A setting that lies somewhere in between make-believe and a place we’ve actually been. It’s nearly impossible to jot down or sketch on paper. This perfect place exists nowhere besides in our own heads. French producer, Zimmer, and Sydney-based singer Panama’s recent collaboration, “Wildflowers” takes a different approach to this very concept. Instead of aiming to tell us exactly what each of their made-up settings might look like, they tell us what it feels like to enter that abstract space. The track seethes with astral textures, layered synths and lavish yet earthy percussion. It cultivates an ideal balance between rich, maximalist production and a stripped-down sound that evolves organically with each passing moment. “Wildflowers” is feeling like you’re walking barefoot on a warm, cloud-like surface only to look down and realize you’ve been walking on cold concrete with heavy boots. It’s racing towards a feeling of deep exhilaration while sitting still. Have a listen and re-enter that place.

Andrea de Varona on November 8, 2018
Ginger Root - Ohio

Ginger Root - Ohio


Ginger Root, aka Cameron Lew, released his third album Mahjong Room this past June. The last track on the work, "Ohio," is a nod to the oldies which initially inspired Lew to begin making music. Although the work can be defined as indie bedroom pop, what largely sets the album apart is the soul influence heard throughout each of the songs. "Ohio" manages to compress all of these songs into two and a half minutes of indie soul pop, with a sound similar to a mix between Vulfpeck and Stevie Wonder. Lew, a film major turned rock star, performs the majority of the instruments on the track, while also doing the engineering, mixing, and mastering. For an artists so clearly dedicated to precision, “Ohio” is a laid back song with a vocal hook that seems to float over the sounds that he is creating.

Samantha Weisenthal on November 7, 2018
Mike Edge - So You're Young

Mike Edge - So You're Young


Mike Edge is a Los Angeles based singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and a producer whose newest single “So You’re Young” is a delightful, genre-bending, soundscape. Tinged with luscious guitars, exuberant bells, and atmospheric keys, his hazy voice is a relaxing escape. The lush female backing vocals add a surreal coating as the waves wash over in the background. In the span of one song, Edge moves between genres, providing an intimate setting within the past and present. The track feels like a celebration of life as he repeats “Here I am” and, for him, it is. The release of “So You’re Young” coincides with Edge being released from the hospital following a life-threatening accident. It's songs like these and stories like Mike Edge’s that remind people to embrace their youth and live life to the fullest.

Shayna Chabrow on November 7, 2018
 Elujay - Little Thangs

Elujay - Little Thangs


Even during the most illogically cold autumn days, Elujay knows how to warm the soul. "Little Thangs" is a classic display of funk and soul, driven by a deep bass line and the Oakland, CA singer’s definitive swagger. The song’s ear worm bridge and hook — a shameless declaration to coming over late to chill — would sound right at home on the latest albums of other modern R&B hybrids such as The Internet or Buddy. There’s a familiarity in Elujay's romanticism and warm vocals that is immediately inviting. But it’s the verses in between that add a refreshing depth to the number, as Elujay details an imperfect relationship full of escalated moods, outside temptations and late night reconciliations over voicemail. He makes it known that there are no lasting, euphoric proclamations of love without also learning to celebrate the tiny, sometimes infuriating human details that define who we are...the little things.

Sam Reynolds on November 7, 2018
Black Belt Eagle Scout - Indians Never Die

Black Belt Eagle Scout - Indians Never Die


Certain performers possess a kind of earnest delivery — one that meets our ears in a deeply harmonious manner and allows us to better understand both the world and ourselves. Portland musician, Katherine Paul aka Black Belt Eagle Scout is one of those artists, and her debut album, Mother of My Children belongs to that rare breed. The record is a reflection of self/identity, loss, and what it means to belong to a place and a people whose face has been tainted over time. What does it mean to grow up within a group that so genially protects Mother Earth, when society has inflicted so much harm onto it? How do you identify as a member of this community when you too are constantly evolving? 

The third single off the album, “Indians Never Die,” probes these kinds of questions. Paul transforms anguish into something powerfully eternal. When she cries out, “Do you ever notice what’s around you? / When it’s all there, in the wake of you,” she is declaring the immortality of her people. Even though her ancestors don’t physically live forever, the customs and teachings they passed down are boundless. “Indians Never Die” works to reshape the way many of us think of heritage, identity, and human connection. The track is anchored by one ceaselessly repeated phrase, “wastin’ away.” It is through the unfeigned repetition of these two words that we can begin to understand why Indians never die.

Andrea de Varona on November 6, 2018
COTE - Meet Me In The Morning

COTE - Meet Me In The Morning


COTE, the project of Brooklyn-based singer/songwriter Taryn Randall, has released a new single bound to leave you feeling warmer on these cold fall days. “Meet Me in the Morning” is a song which we have given the responsibility of holding onto warmer weather sweetness. The work begins with a soft acoustic guitar, low bass and a sharp drum beat, and is later picked up with the plucking of an electric guitar accompanied by Randall's witty lyrics. As her voice gets higher and more instruments begin to enter the song, the tune becomes increasingly popp-y. In this way, Randall is rocking us into a very catchy and uplifting indie bop, taking over the room with a happy go lucky nature. The songs is soft and jovial in nature, putting a smile on our faces during these dreary late fall days.

Samantha Weisenthal on November 6, 2018
Henry Jamison - Boys

Henry Jamison - Boys


Henry Jamison's music has always felt more like a provocative short story than a simple folk song. His latest single, "Boys," tackles the topic of toxic masculinity and the pressures both culture and society put on men that start when they are just young boys. With a current of guitar chords that swell to the addition of a piano and throbbing drum beat, you are swept up in a flow with soothing turns at each refrain. Originally from Burlington, Vermont, Henry Jamison uses alternative folk to unpack social issues he wishes to address. Socially aware and unafraid to call out the harms of stereotypes we push on our youth, Jamison gracefully pulls off a call of action to his listeners. Stay tuned for his new album Gloria Duplex out February 8th on Akira Records.

Madison Hetterly on November 6, 2018
Hollywood - Monster

Hollywood - Monster


Norwegian pop-rock supergroup Hollywood has recently released their debut single, "Monster." Although the band is brand new, each of the three members have had success in their own right. The group consists of synth-pop artist Billie Van, indie rocker Mikhael Paskalev and acoustic-folk singer/songwriter Jonas Alaska. While Hollywood's sound can no doubt be characterized as "pop," the amalgamation of the trio's unique individuals take on the genre to help "Monster" subvert traditional pop-rock tropes. While we may not know what Hollywood has in store for the future this release should leave little uncertainty that they will continue to extend the reaches of innovative pop music.

Bobby Lewis on November 5, 2018
The Vernes - Maybe I'll Feel Better When I'm Dead

The Vernes - Maybe I'll Feel Better When I'm Dead


The Vernes aren’t growing up without a fight. The Philadelphia band's newest album, Maybe I’ll Feel Better When I’m Dead, is practically a coming-of-age tale — filled with lyrics about still living at home, fond moments of nostalgia and panic at the fact that things just aren’t as good as they used to be. The opening title track sets the stage immediately, as it only takes a minute for the band to confess: “Some things never change / But I don’t feel the same / And I don’t feel a thing,” before coming to the conclusion that “maybe I’ll feel better when I’m dead.” Although there lyrics lean towards the melancholy and even morbid, the track's arrangement betrays the band's words. The guitars are soaring and insanely catchy; these are the sounds of an indie band prepared to fill stadiums. If their newest project is any indication, they aren’t far off.

Sam Reynolds on November 5, 2018
Jim and Sam - Unravel

Jim and Sam - Unravel


In “Unravel,” Los Angeles husband-and-wife folk duo Jim and Sam imagine an ancient drum machine and put to it the words of their deepest insecurities. “I’ve got secrets / Too big / To hide under floorboards in my head,” they worry together, placing these skeletons, too large for their floor, firmly in their closet. In a panicky chorus, we see Jim and Sam “unraveling, unraveling,” and we expect the song to swing in the same direction, but the locomotive of a beat never lets up. And it is this unrelenting normalcy of the outside world that makes our inner quirks seem so irreconcilable in the first place. “But I / Convinced / Myself of this,” they sing, an admission that maybe it isn’t so strange to be so strange. When they ignore the rest of the world and all of its external pressures and definitions and expectations, as they do in the striking final chorus, there is a magic that just the two of them share. It's clear that each of them has found someone just as broken as themself, and it’s not strange, it’s beautiful.

Daniel Shanker on November 5, 2018

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